Christman Field Latest Observations
Date Time
MST
Temp
°F
RH
%
DewPt
°F
Wind
mph
Dir
°
Gust
mph
Dir
°
Press
in Hg
Solar
W/m^2
Prec
in
2019-11-12 06:40 10.9 90.4 8.6 2.9 141 4.3 144 24.992 3.4 0.00
2019-11-12 06:35 10.1 91.6 8.1 2.8 133 4.6 137 24.995 1.9 0.00
2019-11-12 06:30 10.3 90.3 8.0 3.2 114 4.2 133 24.996 0.8 0.00
2019-11-12 06:25 11.0 89.2 8.4 2.7 144 4.2 151 24.998 0.3 0.00
2019-11-12 06:20 11.0 91.4 9.0 4.6 151 6.0 173 24.995 0.0 0.00
2019-11-12 06:15 10.5 90.1 8.2 5.3 173 6.3 173 24.992 0.0 0.00
2019-11-12 06:10 10.7 91.2 8.6 5.2 164 6.5 161 24.993 0.0 0.00
2019-11-12 06:05 10.0 90.4 7.7 3.8 158 5.9 160 24.991 0.0 0.00
2019-11-12 06:00 9.8 88.6 7.2 0.7 166 3.2 166 24.991 0.0 0.00
2019-11-12 05:55 10.1 89.3 7.6 0.3 240 1.7 333 24.992 0.0 0.00
2019-11-12 05:50 11.6 86.3 8.3 0.7 352 2.1 352 24.993 0.0 0.00
2019-11-12 05:45 13.2 88.8 10.5 0.5 352 1.5 352 24.994 0.0 0.00
2019-11-12 05:40 13.0 92.0 11.1 0.5 352 1.6 351 24.995 0.0 0.00
2019-11-12 05:35 11.9 92.8 10.2 1.1 351 2.5 352 24.995 0.0 0.00
2019-11-12 05:30 9.8 91.6 7.9 3.1 352 4.5 340 24.996 0.0 0.00
2019-11-12 05:25 8.8 89.4 6.3 3.2 340 3.8 348 24.996 0.0 0.00
2019-11-12 05:20 11.5 84.2 7.6 3.2 5 4.2 5 24.999 0.0 0.00
2019-11-12 05:15 12.1 92.6 10.3 0.3 323 2.1 322 24.999 0.0 0.00
2019-11-12 05:10 10.8 93.8 9.4 0.2 236 1.8 236 25.002 0.0 0.00
2019-11-12 05:05 10.5 93.0 8.9 0.5 290 1.1 290 25.006 0.0 0.00
2019-11-12 05:00 9.2 91.8 7.3 1.2 290 2.0 290 25.012 0.0 0.00
2019-11-12 04:55 8.9 90.4 6.6 2.2 290 4.6 296 25.015 0.0 0.00
2019-11-12 04:50 8.2 92.4 6.5 1.3 295 4.9 299 25.017 0.0 0.00
2019-11-12 04:45 6.3 89.2 3.8 0.5 168 1.7 168 25.020 0.0 0.00
2019-11-12 04:40 7.5 87.4 4.5 1.1 168 2.0 168 25.021 0.0 0.00
2019-11-12 04:35 8.1 88.4 5.3 1.9 105 3.5 25 25.023 0.0 0.00
2019-11-12 04:30 9.4 87.4 6.4 1.2 25 3.0 25 25.024 0.0 0.00
2019-11-12 04:25 10.2 91.8 8.3 0.7 171 1.6 171 25.021 0.0 0.00
2019-11-12 04:20 9.2 90.9 7.1 0.5 171 1.6 171 25.023 0.0 0.00
2019-11-12 04:15 9.3 90.9 7.2 1.2 170 3.4 170 25.032 0.0 0.00
CIRA

Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere

Deb Molenar

Job Title:
Information Technology Specialist
Phone Number:

970-491-8447

Fax Number:

970-491-8241

Mailing Addresss:
Deb Molenar

Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere

Colorado State University

1375 Campus Delivery

Fort Collins, CO 80523-1375
Office Location:
CIRA Room 39
    Publications

    Future Directions for CIRA’s NWS Proving Ground activites now that GOES-16 is operational

    Published Date: 2017
    Published By: Conference

    Advancing potential new satellite products into operations: CIRA’s NWS Proving Ground plans

    Published Date: 2017
    Published By: Conference

    SLIDER: A Satellite Imagery Looper Capable of Viewing Every Pixel of GOES-16 Imagery in Real-Time over the Web

    Published Date: 2018
    Published By: Conference

    SLIDER: Satellite Loop Interactive Data Explorer in Real-time

    Published Date: 2017
    Published By: Conference

    Future directions for CIRA’s NWS Proving Ground activities now that GOES-16 is operational

    Published Date: 2017
    Published By: Conference

    Advancing potential new satellite products into operations: CIRA’s NWS Proving Ground plans

    Published Date: 2018
    Published By: Conference

    SLIDER: A Satellite Imagery Looper Capable of Viewing Every Pixel of GOES-16 Imagery in Real-Time Over the Web

    Published Date: 2018
    Published By: Conference

    Imagery Highlights from the First Six Months of the ABI

    Published Date: 2017
    Published By: Conference

    An Objective Satellite-Based Tropical Cyclone Size Climatology

    Published Date: 2014
    Published By: Geoscientific Model Development

    Storm-centered infrared (IR) imagery of tropical cyclones (TCs) is related to the 850-hPa mean tangential wind at a radius of 500 km (V500) calculated from 6-hourly global numerical analyses for North Atlantic and eastern North Pacific TCs for 1995–2011. V500 estimates are scaled using the climatological vortex decay rate beyond 500 km to estimate the radius of 5 kt (1 kt = 0.514 m s−1) winds (R5) or TC size. A much larger historical record of TC-centered IR imagery (1978–2011) is then used to estimate TC sizes and form a global TC size climatology. The basin-specific distributions of TC size reveal that, among other things, the eastern North Pacific TC basins have the smallest while western North Pacific have the largest TC size distributions. The life cycle of TC sizes with respect to maximum intensity shows that TC growth characteristics are different among the individual TC basins, with the North Atlantic composites showing continued growth after maximum intensity. Small TCs are generally located at lower latitudes, westward steering, and preferred in seasons when environmental low-level vorticity is suppressed. Large TCs are generally located at higher latitudes, poleward steering, and preferred in enhanced low-level vorticity environments. Postmaximum intensity growth of TCs occurs in regions associated with enhanced baroclinicity and TC recurvature, while those that do not grow much are associated with west movement, erratic storm tracks, and landfall at or near the time of maximum intensity. With respect to climate change, no significant long-term trends are found in the dataset of TC size.


    Improved Tropical-Cyclone Flight-Level Wind Estimates Using Routine Infrared Satellite Reconnaissance

    Published Date: 2015
    Published By: Geoscientific Model Development

    A new and improved method for estimating tropical-cyclone (TC) flight-level winds using globally and routinely available TC information and infrared (IR) satellite imagery is presented. The developmental dataset is composed of aircraft reconnaissance (1995–2012) that has been analyzed to a 1 km × 10° polar grid that extends outward 165 km from the TC center. The additional use of an azimuthally average tangential wind at 500 km, based on global model analyses, allows the estimation of winds at larger radii. Analyses are rotated to a direction-relative framework, normalized by dividing the wind field by the observed maximum, and then decomposed into azimuthal wavenumbers in terms of amplitudes and phases. Using a single-field principal component method, the amplitudes and phases of the wind field are then statistically related to principal components of motion-relative IR images and factors related to the climatological radius of maximum winds. The IR principal components allow the wind field to be related to the radial and azimuthal variability of the wind field. Results show that this method, when provided with the storm location, the estimated TC intensity, the TC motion vector, and a single IR image, is able to estimate the azimuthal wavenumber 0 and 1 components of the wind field. The resulting wind field reconstruction significantly improves on the method currently used for satellite-based operational TC wind field estimates. This application has several potential uses that are discussed within.


    An Automated Mobile Phone Photo Relay and Display Concept Applicable to Operational Severe Weather Monitoring

    Published Date: 2015
    Published By: American Meteorological Society

    The increasing use of mobile phones (MPs) equipped with digital cameras and the ability to post images and information to the Internet in real time has significantly improved the ability to report events almost instantaneously. From the perspective of weather forecasters responsible for issuing severe weather warnings, the old adage holds that a picture is indeed worth a thousand words; a single digital image conveys significantly more information than a simple web-submitted text or phone-relayed report. Timely, quality-controlled, and value-added photography allows the forecaster to ascertain the validity and quality of storm reports. The posting of geolocated, time-stamped storm report photographs utilizing an MP application to U.S. National Weather Service (NWS) Weather Forecast Office (WFO) social media pages has generated recent positive feedback from forecasters. This study establishes the conceptual framework, architectural design, and pathway toward implementation of a formalized photo report (PR) system composed of 1) an MP application, 2) a processing and distribution system, and 3) the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System II (AWIPS II) data plug-in software. The requirements and anticipated appearance of such a PR system are presented, along with considerations for possible additional features and applications that extend the utility of the system beyond the realm of severe weather applications.