Christman Field Latest Observations
Date Time
MST
Temp
°F
RH
%
DewPt
°F
Wind
mph
Dir
°
Gust
mph
Dir
°
Press
in Hg
Solar
W/m^2
Prec
in
2019-09-16 14:30 89.2 12.1 30.1 5.1 150 8.7 149 24.728 725.2 0.00
2019-09-16 14:25 89.9 12.0 30.6 6.2 146 9.2 139 24.748 772.6 0.00
2019-09-16 14:20 89.8 12.1 30.6 7.0 122 11.3 134 24.740 770.1 0.00
2019-09-16 14:15 89.8 12.8 32.1 5.5 72 9.3 121 24.763 802.0 0.00
2019-09-16 14:10 90.7 12.3 31.7 7.0 109 11.9 118 24.757 857.0 0.00
2019-09-16 14:05 91.5 11.6 31.0 6.0 121 17.9 179 24.745 887.0 0.00
2019-09-16 14:00 89.5 11.8 29.8 2.4 176 6.1 230 24.738 905.0 0.00
2019-09-16 13:55 88.4 11.8 29.1 6.1 244 8.2 220 24.723 839.0 0.00
2019-09-16 13:50 87.9 12.5 30.1 6.8 264 10.4 233 24.750 679.2 0.00
2019-09-16 13:45 88.4 12.5 30.4 4.6 302 6.7 213 24.752 834.0 0.00
2019-09-16 13:40 88.1 12.5 30.1 4.7 241 8.3 191 24.760 847.0 0.00
2019-09-16 13:35 88.9 12.6 30.9 6.1 135 10.6 141 24.764 883.0 0.00
2019-09-16 13:30 88.8 12.6 30.9 5.5 235 9.6 202 24.766 906.0 0.00
2019-09-16 13:25 89.1 12.1 30.2 4.8 135 7.5 151 24.766 907.0 0.00
2019-09-16 13:20 87.3 12.7 29.9 3.4 151 8.1 136 24.767 790.1 0.00
2019-09-16 13:15 86.4 13.1 30.0 4.5 141 7.0 137 24.768 453.6 0.00
2019-09-16 13:10 85.9 14.2 31.5 3.4 144 7.7 116 24.769 385.8 0.00
2019-09-16 13:05 85.9 12.9 29.2 3.5 78 7.7 93 24.770 329.3 0.00
2019-09-16 13:00 86.2 13.4 30.5 5.3 93 8.7 125 24.771 325.0 0.00
2019-09-16 12:55 87.3 13.2 30.9 5.6 115 8.3 81 24.771 386.8 0.00
2019-09-16 12:50 88.0 12.9 30.8 4.9 82 7.3 82 24.773 818.0 0.00
2019-09-16 12:45 87.2 13.2 30.7 6.1 138 9.1 154 24.774 832.0 0.00
2019-09-16 12:40 86.2 13.6 30.8 6.2 92 10.0 142 24.775 556.3 0.00
2019-09-16 12:35 85.4 13.6 30.1 6.8 124 10.8 126 24.774 452.3 0.00
2019-09-16 12:30 85.4 14.5 31.7 7.3 141 12.1 133 24.773 431.1 0.00
2019-09-16 12:25 85.6 14.2 31.3 8.1 152 11.0 149 24.771 415.6 0.00
2019-09-16 12:20 85.7 13.1 29.3 5.8 119 9.6 127 24.771 494.2 0.00
2019-09-16 12:15 86.6 12.7 29.3 5.6 156 9.8 127 24.775 456.1 0.00
2019-09-16 12:10 87.6 12.9 30.6 7.2 131 10.6 130 24.776 888.0 0.00
2019-09-16 12:05 87.1 13.4 31.1 6.5 151 10.7 164 24.776 875.0 0.00
CIRA

Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere

Bikos, Dan

Dan Bikos

Job Title:
Research Associate III
Phone Number:

970-491-3777

Fax Number:

970-491-8241

Mailing Addresss:
Dan Bikos

Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere

Colorado State University

1375 Campus Delivery

Fort Collins, CO 80523-1375
Office Location:
CIRA Room 05
About Me:

Dan Bikos received his BS in Meteorology at the State University of New York College at Brockport (1995), and MS in Meteorology from the University of Oklahoma (1998). His areas of interest include severe weather, lake-effect snow and applications of satellite imagery to weather forecasting, particularly on the mesoscale.  Dan has been a research associate at CIRA since 1998 working for the Virtual Institute for Satellite Integration Training (VISIT) project in which he develops training for NWS forecasters.  Distance learning software (VISITview) combined with a conference call are utilized to deliver the training to NWS forecast offices.  Dan has instructed more than 300 hours of live tele-training sessions, primarily dealing with operational applications of satellite imagery.

Past Work

Research

Wednesday, March 12, 2014
  • Support of the Virtual Institute for Satellite Integration Training (VISIT)
  • Advanced Weather (AWIPS) Support for Satellite Hydro-Meteorology (SHyMet) and Virtual Institute for Satellite Integration Training (VISIT) Training and Education
    Publications

    Using the multisensor advected layer precipitable water product in the operational forecast environment

    Published Date: 2018
    Published By: Journal Article

    Using the GOES-16 Split Window Difference to Detect a Boundary Prior to Cloud Formation

    Published Date: 2018
    Published By: American Meteorological Society

    GOES-R training seminar at the NWS WFO

    Published Date: 2017
    Published By: Conference

    Future Directions for CIRA’s NWS Proving Ground activites now that GOES-16 is operational

    Published Date: 2017
    Published By: Conference

    Advancing potential new satellite products into operations: CIRA’s NWS Proving Ground plans

    Published Date: 2017
    Published By: Conference

    Blended Multisensor Satellite Products for Forecasting Heavy Precipitation

    Published Date: 2017
    Published By: Conference

    VISIT/SHyMet Training on New Applications of GOES-16 Imagery

    Published Date: 2017
    Published By: Conference

    Himawari-8 Using New Spectral Bands for Meteorological Applications

    Published Date: 2017
    Published By: Conference

    Future directions for CIRA’s NWS Proving Ground activities now that GOES-16 is operational

    Published Date: 2017
    Published By: Conference

    Advancing potential new satellite products into operations: CIRA’s NWS Proving Ground plans

    Published Date: 2018
    Published By: Conference

    GOES-16 ABI Observations of Lower Tropospheric Structures of Water Vapor at 1.38 µm

    Published Date: 2018
    Published By: Conference

    Tracking Water Vapor with Multisensor Blended Products for Forecasters

    Published Date: 2018
    Published By: Conference

    VISIT / SHyMet Training on New Applications of GOES-16 Imagery

    Published Date: 2017
    Published By: Conference

    Evaluation of and Suggested Improvements to the WSM6 Microphysics in WRF-ARW Using Synthetic and Observed GOES-13 Imagery

    Published Date: 2014
    Published By: American Meteorological Society
    Synthetic satellite imagery can be employed to evaluate simulated cloud fields. Past studies have revealed that the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) single-moment 6-class (WSM6) microphysics scheme in the Advanced Research WRF (WRF-ARW) produces less upper-level ice clouds within synthetic images compared to observations. Synthetic Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-13 (GOES-13) imagery at 10.7 μm of simulated cloud fields from the 4-km National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) WRF-ARW is compared to observed GOES-13 imagery. Histograms suggest that too few points contain upper-level simulated ice clouds. In particular, side-by-side examples are shown of synthetic and observed anvils. Such images illustrate the lack of anvil cloud associated with convection produced by the 4-km NSSL WRF-ARW. A vertical profile of simulated hydrometeors suggests that too much cloud water mass may be converted into graupel mass, effectively reducing the main source of ice mass in a simulated anvil. Further, excessive accretion of ice by snow removes ice from an anvil by precipitation settling. Idealized sensitivity tests reveal that a 50% reduction of the accretion rate of ice by snow results in a significant increase in anvil ice of a simulated storm. Such results provide guidance as to which conversions could be reformulated, in a more physical manner, to increase simulated ice mass in the upper troposphere.

    An Automated Mobile Phone Photo Relay and Display Concept Applicable to Operational Severe Weather Monitoring

    Published Date: 2015
    Published By: American Meteorological Society

    The increasing use of mobile phones (MPs) equipped with digital cameras and the ability to post images and information to the Internet in real time has significantly improved the ability to report events almost instantaneously. From the perspective of weather forecasters responsible for issuing severe weather warnings, the old adage holds that a picture is indeed worth a thousand words; a single digital image conveys significantly more information than a simple web-submitted text or phone-relayed report. Timely, quality-controlled, and value-added photography allows the forecaster to ascertain the validity and quality of storm reports. The posting of geolocated, time-stamped storm report photographs utilizing an MP application to U.S. National Weather Service (NWS) Weather Forecast Office (WFO) social media pages has generated recent positive feedback from forecasters. This study establishes the conceptual framework, architectural design, and pathway toward implementation of a formalized photo report (PR) system composed of 1) an MP application, 2) a processing and distribution system, and 3) the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System II (AWIPS II) data plug-in software. The requirements and anticipated appearance of such a PR system are presented, along with considerations for possible additional features and applications that extend the utility of the system beyond the realm of severe weather applications.